Needles · Sewing · Sewing Machines

Types of Sewing Machine Needles

Types of Sewing Machine Needles – Sewing machine needles come in different types and sizes, each with a specific purpose or function.

Types of Sewing Machine Needles

Types of Sewing Machine Needles - Sewing machine needles come in different types and sizes, each with a specific purpose or function.

The type of needle you use for your sewing project can affect the quality of your stitching and the overall outcome of your project. In this article, we will discuss the different types of sewing machine needles and their uses.

  1. Universal Needle: The universal needle is the most common type of needle used in sewing machines. It is suitable for sewing a wide range of fabrics, including woven and knit fabrics. Universal needles have a slightly rounded point and can be used with most thread types.
  2. Ballpoint Needle: Ballpoint needles are designed for use with knit fabrics, as they have a slightly rounded tip that glides through the fibers of the fabric without damaging them. They are also suitable for sewing on woven fabrics with a looser weave.
  3. Stretch Needle: Stretch needles are similar to ballpoint needles, but they have a more pronounced tip that can penetrate stretchy fabrics more easily. They are designed for use with fabrics such as lycra, spandex, and other stretchy materials.
  1. Denim Needle: Denim needles have a sharp and strong point that can penetrate through thick layers of fabric, making them ideal for sewing denim, canvas, and other heavy fabrics.
  2. Leather Needle: Leather needles have a chisel-shaped tip that cuts through leather and other tough materials. They have a larger eye and a deeper groove that allows them to accommodate thicker threads.
  3. Quilting Needle: Quilting needles are designed for use with multiple layers of fabric, such as those used in quilting. They have a tapered point that can easily penetrate through several layers of fabric without causing damage.
  4. Embroidery Needle: Embroidery needles have a larger eye and a deeper groove to accommodate embroidery threads. They also have a slightly rounded tip that can penetrate through fabrics without causing damage.
  5. Twin Needle: Twin needles are used for creating parallel rows of stitches that are evenly spaced. They have two needles mounted on a single shaft, which can be used for decorative stitching, hemming, and other techniques.

What are the numbers on sewing machine needles?

Sewing machine needles are labeled with numbers that indicate the size and type of needle. The most common numbering system is the metric system, which uses a number to represent the diameter of the needle in millimeters. For example, a needle labeled “80/12” has a diameter of 0.80 mm, or 12/100 of an inch.

Other needle sizing systems are also in use, including the American sizing system and the European sizing system. In the American system, the needle size is represented by a number, and the higher the number, the larger the needle. In the European system, the needle size is also represented by a number, but the lower the number, the larger the needle.

In addition to size, sewing machine needles are also labeled with a type or purpose. Common types include universal, denim, embroidery, and leather needles. Each type of needle is designed to work best with a specific type of fabric or thread.

US Sewing Machine Needle Sizes


Sewing machine needles in the United States are typically classified by their size, which is denoted by a number. The higher the number, the larger the needle size. Here is a list of common sewing machine needle sizes used in the US:

  1. Size 8 (60/8): This needle is commonly used for lightweight fabrics such as silk and chiffon.
  2. Size 9 (65/9): Suitable for lightweight fabrics like silk, satin, and lightweight cotton.
  3. Size 10 (70/10): Used for lightweight to medium-weight fabrics, including cotton, rayon, and linen.
  4. Size 11 (75/11): Appropriate for medium-weight fabrics like cotton, linen, and polyester blends.
  5. Size 12 (80/12): A versatile needle size suitable for medium-weight fabrics, including woven and knit fabrics.
  6. Size 14 (90/14): Used for medium to heavy-weight fabrics, such as denim, twill, and canvas.
  7. Size 16 (100/16): Designed for heavy-weight fabrics, like upholstery fabric, thick denim, or leather.
  8. Size 18 (110/18): Suitable for very heavy-weight fabrics, including leather, vinyl, and heavyweight canvas.

(Indicate European, still see list below)

Please note that these sizes are commonly available in most sewing machine needle brands and models. However, there may be additional sizes or variations depending on the manufacturer and the type of sewing project you are working on. Always refer to your sewing machine’s user manual or consult the needle manufacturer for specific recommendations.

European Sewing Machine Needle Sizes

European needle sizes are designated by a different numbering system compared to the US sizes. Instead of a single number, European needle sizes are represented by two numbers: one for the European metric sizing system (denoted by the number) and the other for the American sizing system (denoted by the fraction). Here are some commonly used European needle sizes along with their corresponding American sizes:

  1. Size 60/8: Equivalent to a US size 8.
  2. Size 65/9: Equivalent to a US size 9.
  3. Size 70/10: Equivalent to a US size 10.
  4. Size 75/11: Equivalent to a US size 11.
  5. Size 80/12: Equivalent to a US size 12.
  6. Size 90/14: Equivalent to a US size 14.
  7. Size 100/16: Equivalent to a US size 16.
  8. Size 110/18: Equivalent to a US size 18.

Sometimes you will see it as 18/110. Where those numbers are swapped from the list above.

It’s important to note that the European needle sizes may vary slightly depending on the manufacturer. Additionally, European needle sizes can also be designated by a single number without the American sizing equivalent. In such cases, the European number corresponds to the metric sizing system (e.g., size 80 corresponds to 80/12 in the American system).

In conclusion, the type of sewing machine needle you choose will depend on the fabric you are working with and the type of stitch you want to create. It is important to choose the right needle for your project to ensure a high-quality outcome. By understanding the different types of sewing machine needles and their uses, you can make informed decisions when selecting the appropriate needle for your sewing project.

Did I miss any type of needles?

If so, feel free to let me know so I can add them to the list.


Upcoming Events

This is a list of the upcoming events that Steve Sews will be at. If you know of one in the East Tennessee area, let me know.

None at this time. Check back later.


Meet …

Meet the staff and/or equipment for Steve Sews.

SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

Don’t miss a single blog post about sewing, quilting, crafts, and recipes! Plus so much more!

Please like, subscribed, comment, share

Follow on WordPress

Follow Steve Sews Stuff on WordPress.com

Follow Steve Sews Stuff on Social Media:

You can also choose to follow Steve Sews Stuff on social media as well. (@SteveSews2)


Below are some examples of blog entries from all blogs that I do. (Courageous Christian Father, Steve Sews Stuff and SteveZ DesignZ).

Recent Feed of All of Steve’s Blogs

Loading RSS Feed


Recent Posts on Steve Sews

Below is a list of the most recent blog posts found on Steve Sews for you to check out.

  • The Cool Maker Toy Sewing Machine
    Discovering Creativity: The Cool Maker Toy Sewing Machine — Are you ready to ignite your child’s creativity and imagination? Introducing the Cool Maker Toy Sewing Machine, a fun and engaging way for kids to explore the world of sewing and design. In today’s fast-paced digital age, it’s refreshing to find toys that encourage hands-on, creative play, and the Cool Maker Toy Sewing Machine does just that. #CoolMaker
  • You can’t use up fabric scraps. The more you use, the more you seem to have!!
    You can’t use up fabric scraps. The more you use, the more you seem to have!! There’s a phenomenon that many enthusiasts sewers and quilters have experienced firsthand: the mysterious abundance of fabric scraps. Despite efforts to whittle down the stash, it often seems that the more scraps you use, the more appear. But far from being a burden, these remnants hold a world of creative possibilities. In this post, we’ll explore why you can’t seem to use up fabric scraps and how embracing them can lead to endless inspiration.
  • What is a tailor’s clapper?
    A tailor’s clapper is a simple but useful tool for sewing enthusiasts who want to achieve crisp and flat seams or creases on their fabric. In this blog post, I will explain what a tailor’s clapper is, how it works, and why you should have one in your sewing kit. #tailorsclapper
  • Why Handmade Gifts Are the Best Gifts
    Why Handmade Gifts Are the Best Gifts – Have you ever received a handmade gift from someone and felt touched by their thoughtfulness and creativity? Or have you ever made a gift for someone and enjoyed the process of crafting something unique and personal for them? If you answered yes to either of these questions, then you know the value and joy of handmade gifts.
  • I might be hanging by a thread but at least it’s by the hem of His garment
    I might be hanging by a thread but at least it’s by the hem of His garment (Hanging by a Thread, Held by His Hem: Finding Strength in Faith) In life, there are moments when we feel as though we’re hanging by a thread, our strength waning, and our resolve tested. Yet, amidst the chaos and uncertainty, there is a source of unwavering strength, a lifeline that sustains us even in our weakest moments. It is the touch of the Jesus’ garment, the hem that offers hope, healing, and restoration.

Clipart: UnsplashPixabayPexelsOpenverseAdobe ExpressAdobe StockFreePikMetroCreative, Wonder AI, Algo AI and more. This site uses Amazon Affiliate Ads & Google Ads.


About Post Author


Your Comment Is Appreciated!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.