Pinking · Pinking Shears,

How to sharpen pinking shears

How to sharpen pinking shears – Sharpening pinking shears can be a little tricky, but it’s definitely possible to do it at home with the right tools and techniques. #PinkingShears

How to sharpen pinking shears

How to sharpen pinking shears - Sharpening pinking shears can be a little tricky, but it's definitely possible to do it at home with the right tools and techniques. #PinkingShears

Here are some steps to follow: to sharpen your pinking shears:

  1. Clean the pinking shears: Before sharpening the pinking shears, make sure they are clean and free of any debris. You can use a soft cloth and some rubbing alcohol to clean the blades.
  2. Disassemble the pinking shears: You will need to take the pinking shears apart to sharpen the blades. Look for a small screw on the pivot point of the shears and loosen it with a screwdriver. Be careful not to lose any small parts.

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  1. Sharpen the blades: Use a sharpening stone or a sharpening tool specifically designed for pinking shears to sharpen the blades. Hold the sharpening tool against the blades and move it back and forth along the entire length of the blade. Repeat this process several times, making sure to keep the angle consistent.
  2. Reassemble the pinking shears: Once you have finished sharpening the blades, carefully reassemble the pinking shears. Make sure all the parts are in their correct places and tighten the screw on the pivot point.
  3. Test the pinking shears: Test the pinking shears by cutting through a piece of fabric. If they still feel dull, repeat the sharpening process until the blades are sharp enough.

Remember to always handle pinking shears carefully, as the blades are sharp and can cause injury. Additionally, it’s recommended to have your pinking shears professionally sharpened every 1-2 years to maintain their longevity and performance.

What are pinking shears?

Pinking shears are specialized scissors used in sewing and crafting to create a zigzag or sawtooth edge on fabric or paper. The zigzag edge prevents the fabric or paper from fraying and gives it a decorative finish.

Pinking shears have a distinctive blade design with teeth that are serrated and angled in a way that allows them to create the zigzag pattern. The blades are usually between 7 and 9 inches long, and the handles are often designed to fit comfortably in the hand for prolonged use.

The name “pinking” comes from the term “pinked” which means “decorated with a perforated or punched pattern”. The term “pinked” was used in the 14th century to describe the practice of decorating the edges of fabric or leather with small, evenly spaced holes or cuts. Pinking shears were invented in the 1930s and quickly became popular among seamstresses and tailors for their ability to create the same decorative effect in a more efficient and accurate way. (Learn more about pinking.)

Today, pinking shears are widely used in sewing and crafting, and are available in a variety of sizes and blade designs to accommodate different materials and projects.

Using Aluminum Foil

Aluminum foil is not recommended for sharpening pinking shears. While it may seem like a quick and easy solution, aluminum foil is not abrasive enough to properly sharpen the blades. In fact, using aluminum foil to sharpen pinking shears can actually damage the blades or make them even duller.

It’s best to use a sharpening stone or a sharpening tool specifically designed for pinking shears to ensure that the blades are sharpened correctly and safely. If you’re unsure how to sharpen your pinking shears, it’s always a good idea to seek the advice of a professional or someone experienced in sharpening tools.

Benefits of Pinking Shears

Pinking shears are a useful tool in sewing and quilting which can be used for a variety of purposes. Here are some of the most common uses for pinking shears in sewing:

  1. Preventing fraying: Pinking shears are often used to finish the edges of fabric to prevent fraying. The zigzag edge created by the pinking shears helps to stop the fabric from unraveling.
  2. Creating decorative edges: The zigzag edge created by pinking shears can also be used to create decorative edges on fabric. This can add a unique and attractive finish to a garment or project.
  3. Cutting curved edges: Pinking shears can be useful for cutting curved edges, such as those found on collars, cuffs, and necklines. The serrated edge of the shears helps to prevent the fabric from puckering or bunching as it’s cut.
  4. Trimming seam allowances: Pinking shears can be used to trim the seam allowances of a garment. This can help to reduce bulk and create a smoother finish.
  5. Cutting out pattern pieces: Pinking shears can be used to cut out pattern pieces, particularly if the fabric being used is prone to fraying. The zigzag edge created by the pinking shears helps to prevent fraying and keeps the edges of the fabric neat and tidy.

While pinking shears are primarily used in sewing, they do have a few non-sewing benefits as well:

  1. Crafting: Pinking shears can be used in a variety of crafting projects to create decorative edges on paper or other materials.
  2. Gift wrapping: Pinking shears can be used to create unique and decorative edges on gift wrapping paper, making your gifts stand out.
  3. Scrapbooking: Pinking shears can be used to create interesting edges on photos, paper, and other materials used in scrapbooking.
  4. Gardening: Pinking shears can be useful in gardening for trimming the edges of flower petals to create a decorative effect.
  5. Haircutting: In a pinch, pinking shears can be used to trim hair, particularly for creating textured layers.

Overall, while pinking shears are primarily used in sewing, they can be a useful tool in a variety of non-sewing applications.


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